Pineapple Panna Cotta

Pine Apple Panna Cotta by The High Heel Gourmet 1 (1)

This is just a simple recipe. Can you tell that I actually don’t want to waste anything that comes from inside the delicious pineapple? I also recommend buying two pineapples—they’re not that expensive right now. I can get them for $7 each from WholePayCheck, so anywhere else would be even cheaper!

To make the Valentines dinner set, you can even juice the pineapple to make drinks. Okay, the whole truth is, last time the panna cotta that I made while making fried rice turned out to be a disaster. The pineapple jelly didn’t set! Hahaha so I had to make it again. I had to increase the portion of the gelatin powder 2.5 times more than last time. OMG, who would have thought that the jelly with fruit would take this much gelatin?

This was from last time that the pineapple jelly didn't set. It was tasty and certainly edible but presentability was quite questionable, so I have to re-make them.

This was from last time that the pineapple jelly didn’t set. It was tasty and certainly edible but presentability was quite questionable, so I have to re-make them.

This is the successful version (this recipe) but don't dare me to take them out of the cup.

This is the successful version (this recipe) but don’t dare me to take them out of the cup.

Feel free to add alcohol, rum, or other fruits. Same as the pineapple fried rice, you add what you like to eat in the ingredients. Totally free style–after all, you are the one eating it.

Ingredients for the pineapple jelly

Pineapple, chopped up with juice, in total about 1 cup (You could use the pineapple bits and pieces that you scooped out to make the pineapple bowl for the fried rice)

Sugar 2-3 tablespoons (depends on how sweet your pineapple is. I only used two for mine)

Salt 1/4 teaspoon

Gelatin powder 2 1/2 teaspoons (bloom in 1/2 cup of water)

Ingredients for coconut jelly

Coconut cream 1/2 cup

Whole milk 1/2 cup

Sugar 3 tablespoons

Salt 1/4 teaspoons

Gelatin powder 1 teaspoon (bloom in 1/4 cup of water)

Method

1) Put coconut cream, milk, sugar and salt in a pot, set it over medium heat. Stir until the sugar dissolves, then add the bloomed gelatin, stir again until they’re all dissolved and become smooth. Turn off the heat and let it cool down.

2) Put pineapple pieces and juice, 2 tablespoons of sugar, and salt in another pot, set it over medium heat, stir until the sugar dissolve, add the bloomed gelatin, stir again until they’re all dissolve. Taste to see if it is sweet enough. If it’s not, add more sugar. Turn off the heat and let it cool down.

3) Pour the coconut jelly in the mould and chill until it sets, about half an hour.

Pine Apple Panna Cotta by The High Heel Gourmet 1

4) Bring the mould out and pour the pineapple jelly in the mould to make another layer, chill in the fridge again for another half an hour.

Pine Apple Panna Cotta by The High Heel Gourmet 3 (1)

5) Keep doing multiple layers this way. Or you can do only two layers and serve.

Pine Apple Panna Cotta by The High Heel Gourmet 4 (1)

Pine Apple Panna Cotta by The High Heel Gourmet 4

Happy Valentine’s

Pine Apple Panna Cotta by The High Heel Gourmet 2 (1)

28 thoughts on “Pineapple Panna Cotta

  1. Just discovering your blog to make an amazing Thai valentine day with friends 🙂 quick question, can I use agar-agar to replace gelatin? thanks for your expert answer.

    • Gelatin is made from animal and Agar Agar is made from seaweeds. Only thing that made them different is the gelatin doesn’t need to be boiled to be set properly but Agar Agar need to reach the boiling temperature to be able to set properly.

      This panna cotta need to be boiled on both layer. I don’t see why can’t you substituted. Try it. I have not tasted with Agar Agar so I don’t know the right amount to be used but you can try it yourself.

      If you are a vegan. Agar Agar is the only choice. Let me know the result.

  2. I’ve always been told that you *can’t* use fresh pineapple in gelatin, that there’s an enzyme in pineapple that destroys the gel. But I guess if you put in enough gelatin you can overcome it! That would explain why you had to put so much gelatin in.

    My chemistry is a little rusty, but I guess this result would mean it’s more of a chemical reaction than a biochemical reaction with an enzyme that gets used repeatedly.This sounds like more of a chemical reaction where you have an excess of reactants. If you put in enough gelatin you have gelatin left over to gel! Cooks Illustrated, with their scientific approach, probably has this answer somewhere. 🙂 But for now it seems enough to just know that if you use pineapple, use a *lot* of gelatin!

    • My food scientist friend (Looooooong times ago, I managed to grab a BS. major in Photographic Science and Printing Technology so I have a lot of scientist friends who now became professors and love to analyze my food problem) told me to use “pectin” instead of gelatin too but I don’t like the texture of it. So I’m stubborn and continue to use the gelatin. I normally use the sheet gelatin but for stuff like this I used the powder one. I guess your theory works. The flavor jelly in the package (one that you just mix with water) are set normally even though there is a lot of citric acid in them. Well if they can do it, I can too. (Yeah with a few try…lol)…

      Thanks for stoping by and give a nice tip 🙂

      • That helps explain why your photography is so beautiful! I just got a new camera. So we’ll see if mine improve or if the problem is more me than it is the equipment. 🙂

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s